Room For Improvement

As an intentional leader, you spend a great deal of time working on improving yourself with the hope that it translates into improved leadership actions. I was reflecting on my own self-improvement last week while listening to a podcast by Marshall Goldsmith. He is the author of  What Got You Here, Won’t Get You There.  As a personal life coach, Goldsmith was discussing how leaders need to continually work on themselves. A question instantly came to mind, “Do you know what room in your leadership house should be the largest?”  The ROOM for IMPROVEMENT! Now think about that for a second and ask yourself, “How big is my ROOM for IMPROVEMENT?” if it is like mine, your need is huge, but maybe your room is about the size of a small closet. We get so caught up in the day to day activities that we often forget to work on our own self-improvement. This has made me rethink my commitment to self-improvement and to consciously expand the size of this room in my own Leadership House…It has helped me reconnect with what I call the Four Pillars of Leadership: Mindset, Self-Reflection, Self-Healing, and Emotional Intelligence. 

How about you?….Would love to hear how you work on self-improvement as a leader every day. Join In…

Dean

“Do you know what room in your leadership house should be the largest?  The ROOM for Improvement!”

“We get so caught up in the day-to-day activities that we often forget to work on our own self-improvement.”

“This has made me rethink my commitment to self-improvement and to consciously expand the size of this room in my own Leadership House.”

“It has helped me reconnect with what I call the four pillars of leadership: mindset, self-reflection, self-healing and emotional intelligence.”

4 thoughts on “Room For Improvement

  1. I heard John Maxwell tell a story about someone who asked him the question of who is the hardest person to lead in his organization. Dr. Maxwell noted that it was himself. I think we sometimes lose sight of that. Before we can lead anyone, we have to look in the mirror and find ways to improve our self.

    One way I try to do that is by reading. Reading leadership books keeps me motivated and inspired. However, reading alone is not good enough. I need to be intentional on picking an area in leadership that I need to improve upon, and dedicate time and ways to improve in that area. I need to apply the principles that I am being taught.

    • Awesome thoughts! Thanks for sharing! John Maxwell is one of the masters of leadership. He was asked once who are the hardest people to manage? His response was “yourself”.

      Dean

  2. Thank you so much for spelling this out so clearly. I love the home improvement analogy . It is so true that we so often do put our personal development behind our other responsibilities when, if we thought about it, our personal development could make our other responsibilities flow more seamlessly whether it be as a parent, student or professional.

    • Self-improvement really is about the “want to” and it’s the hardest thing you’ll commit to do. I often say you have to have 3 things: Discipline, Focus, and Determination. Discipline is probably the hardest one of those because again it’s about self-motivation. In our society it’s hard to put ourselves above others, but what I’ve found is that by making sure I take care of myself first (fitness, mindset, sharpening the saw, etc.), I am better able to help others which is what it’s all about.

      Dean

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